Social Blot

Learn From Your Top Retweets

Top Five
Twitonomy can show you which of your tweets have been retweeted the most. I thought I’d take a look at my top five and see if I could learn anything about what made them more popular. (I’ve included instructions for finding your own top five at the bottom of this post, in case you’re interested.)

The Tweets

Alright, this one doesn’t count. I teach a social media class and I used this tweet in an exercise about retweeting. Moving on.

We seem to like acknowledging seasonal landmarks and special dates. (May 4, anyone?) More importantly, this tweet offers a little encouragement to people who can’t wait for the days to get longer again. (Like me.)

This one’s recent. It links to a post I wrote about a local social media and technology event that’s coming up. People may have liked the fact that the event is the first of its kind in Canada. (That makes it special.) Plus, quite a few people who follow me on Twitter might be interested in this kind of event.

Strange. This tweet is from exactly a year ago today. I was at a digital media event here in Hamilton. This statement was probably from one of the presentations. People may have noticed it because of one of the hashtags. It’s also cheering for a popular area in the city. (One of the retweets is from an account I managed.)

This one was retweeted by a couple of people who have followings that would be particularly interested in the topic. That probably helped me get a couple additional retweets.

What Can We Learn?

This isn’t particularly scientific, but here are a few observations:

A tweet doesn’t need to include a link or hashtag to be popular. If it resonates with people they’ll share it.

Twitter may be a global network, but you can still use it locally. Three out of five of these tweets are related to my city and include its hashtag (#HamOnt).

Your connections with people in person (like at events) and online can make a difference to how many people see your message.

People like (and share) things that are special or interesting specifically to them.

What do you think? Anything else?

Your Top Five

Want to use Twitonomy to find out which of your posts got retweeted the most?

Go to Twitonomy.com.

Under “get started, try the beta now” click on the “sign in” button.

Click on the “sign in with Twitter” button.

Once you’ve given the site permission to use your Twitter account, it will load your Twitonomy dashboard.

At the top of the page, click on the “profile” link.

Scroll down until you see the “tweets most retweeted” section on the left side of the page.

Any interesting observations?

Tagged on:

3 thoughts on “Learn From Your Top Retweets

Leave a Reply